Public Relations For Animals 

 

The Animal Network of Orange County

"Action Plan

For

Missing Pets"

An Information Page

 

 Promotion For Animals   In Need  

 

I n f o r m a t i o n 

 

What To Do When You Have Found A Pet

 

What To Do When Your Pet Is Missing

 

 

What To Do When You Have Found A Lost Pet

Written By DiAnna Pfaff-Martin From My Experience In Animal Rescuer in Orange County, CA   - contact@animalnetwork.org

  • If you find an dog wandering the streets or an unknown cat hiding under your car don't just assume someone has abandoned them. Take them into safety without placing yourself in danger. It just takes a minute for an animal to dart in front of a car or head for a busy street without knowledge. Be prepared with a carrier for a cat and some tasty food and for a dog use a leash, rope or even a bunji cord. 
  • Look for tag identification and call to make a happy reunion. Most people losing an animal are distraught and are looking for the animal but just don't know where to look. 
  • Scan for microchip identification at the vets office or a reputable rescue that has a scanner. Today many animals are chipped and the owner can be identified in minutes. The size of a pencil lead implant between the shoulder blades saves live these days. All animals should be microhipped to protect them if entering an animal shelter without owner identification.  
  • Unfortunately it is true that a worried pet parent will look for their at the animal shelter. But, most shelters and many animal rescue groups are "pro-humane" which mercifully kills animals for reasons of overcrowding, sickness and cage aggression, (all of which could happen). Pro-life animal groups have to restrict entry as since they do not euthanize animals must find homes before a space could open up or require participation in order to help the animal that you found. 
  • If you do turn the animal that you found over to an animal shelter it is advised that you write down the impound number and let them know right then that you would like to consider adopting the animal if it were to be euthanized. Otherwise use the impound number to call, visit or check the website to confirm its availability. Be aware that only rescue groups know who is red listed and once red listed they could be killed without notice.
  • Create Flyers But Beware... City's laws forbid littering! Blowing papers are seen as trash. Make you’re your doorstep delivery flyers are secured partially under the door mat. Putting in mail boxes is illegal and a federal offense. However a mail slot in the front door or the garage is the owner’s property.  
  • Post Flyers At The Local Veterinary Office Bulletin Boards.   
  • Tips For "Found" Flyers - Never Put the Breed Or Color On Your "Found" Flyer, Instead Use Size Descriptions Such as Large, Medium or Small for Dog's and For Cats just List found Cat and have the caller describe and show proof of veterinary treatment. BEWARE of people trying to get animals for the wrong reasons.  Not everyone is as nice as you! 
  • Advertise In The Local Papers    

    The Orange County Register - 714.796.7000  in the classified section has “Free” Found Ads and Charges for Lost Animal Ads. Found ads are 3 lines free for 3 days and can be renewed every three days. Lost Ads are $27.00 for 3 lines for 7 days. (2006 prices)

    The Los Angeles Times - 800.234.4444 in the classified section has “Free” found Animal Ads and Charges for Lost Animal Ads. Lost Ads are 4 days three lines for $52.00 (2006 prices)

    Free Lost Ads in Local Area Papers as well as the Recycler Paper is always free. 

    • THE NETWORK's successful experiences indicate a cat missing for three months may be only 4-7 blocks away and after six months a distance of 10-12 blocks, usually being fed by a "Good Samaritan".
    • Protect Your Pets With a Microchip Pet Recovery System! Talk With Your Veterinarian About Insertion and remember to register the microchip with the national recovery database.

What To Do When You Have Lost A Pet

Written By DiAnna Pfaff-Martin From My Experience In Animal Rescuer in Orange County, CA   - contact@animalnetwork.org

  • Call your local Animal Control and also search “your” County Animal Shelter’s web site daily for the latest impound photos. Don’t forget to ask about injured animals, or the dead that may not be noted.
  • Notify the Microchip Company who implanted your pet’s microchip of the animal becoming lost and make sure that you your contact information is current. (If you haven’t heard of microchipping pets, then research this amazing life-saving item.
  • Make 500 flyers noting a “ Dollar” Amount REWARD using the words… “For the Safe Return” of “You Animals Name”. Go door to door, meet and greet your neighbors and leave a flyers on the doorsteps (Be sure to place the flyer so it won’t blow and become trash) One ream of paper is 500 sheets.  
  • You have only a small window of time to reclaim your pet and will be charged an impound fee and boarding fee for each day your animal was there. Note: In some cases the adoption fee may be less.
  • City's laws forbid littering! Blowing papers are seen as trash. Make you’re your doorstep delivery flyers are secured partially under the door mat. Putting in mail boxes is illegal and a federal offense. However a mail slot in the front door or the garage is the owner’s property. 
  • Advertise your lost pet in your local city papers.

The Orange County Register - 714.796.7000  in the classified section has “Free” Found Ads and Charges for Lost Animal Ads. Found ads are 3 lines free for 3 days and can be renewed every three days. Lost Ads are $27.00 for 3 lines for 7 days. (2006 prices)

The Los Angeles Times - 800.234.4444 in the classified section has “Free” found Animal Ads and Charges for Lost Animal Ads. Lost Ads are 4 days three lines for $52.00 (2006 prices)

Free Lost Ads in Local Area Papers as well as the Recycler Paper is always free. 

  • THE NETWORK's successful experiences indicate a cat missing for three months may be only 4-7 blocks away and after six months a distance of 10-12 blocks, usually being fed by a "Good Samaritan".
  • Protect Your Pets With a Microchip Pet Recovery System! Talk With Your Veterinarian About Insertion and remember to register the microchip with the national recovery database.

      Animal control officers nation wide scan the animals for microchips during   the impound    process. This is one way to insure your pet will be returned!

  • Don't give up, your actions may help your dog or cat to be found!

MORE TIPS COMING SOON!

 

 

Always spay, neuter, microchip, collar and tag your pets.